Millennials are a bunch of computer-game-playing, cell-phone-wielding hipsters with weird hairstyles and too many tattoos. Well… to the Boomers, at least. But what if we told you that playing computer games could be the perfect training ground for today’s business leaders?

Cathy Cooper, a Senior Director at Insight-Driven Marketing at SAP, tells a story of how she watched her Millennial daughter playing World of Warcraft (WoW) and realised that her leadership role in the game developed a range of skills needed by leaders in the modern workplace. And she’s not the only one who sees it. Here are a few of the skills she mentions:

1. Virtual collaboration

The boardroom isn’t a mahogany-coloured space for board members anymore. It’s online. And it’s attended by people across every level from all over the world. So collaboration (through multiple digital channels) is key – something there’s plenty of on WoW.

2. Building great teams

Recruiting takes into account the cultures, skills, and personalities of new candidates and the teams they’ll be joining. The same goes for building battle teams.

3. Reward & recognition

You don’t just work for fun. A promotion and a raise once in a while are nice. And the same goes for WoW. Fight a good battle and you can look forward to getting some new battle gear. Lead a WoW team? You need to distribute those rewards fairly and transparently too.

4. Maintain accountability

You’re responsible for the work you do. Maybe even the work your team does. And that means everyone needs to be accountable for his/her actions. On WoW, everyone can see who’s doing what – so if anyone slacks off (even the leader), the team will know about it.

Still not convinced? Oliver Chiang from Forbes sees career benefits in playing computer games. Experts even suggest [video gamers will do better in their careers[(https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20140328041226-5973711-kids-who-play-video-games-do-better-in-their-careers). And how about if we said playing Candy Crush makes you more productive at work? Madness. Or is it?